What is a crime of moral turpitude?

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No one is charged with a Crime of Moral Turpitude (CMT).  This is a catch-all.   A crime can qualify regardless of level of seriousness of the charge, or the sentence imposed for it, or the circumstances surrounding the commission of the crime.  If you were convicted, or admitted to having committed, a crime which constitutes a CMT or conspiring to commit such a crime, you may be inadmissible into the U.S. 

The problem is there is no clear definition of a CMT either by statute or case law.  It generally referrs to conduct which is inherently base, vile, or depraved, contrary to the accepted rules of morality and the duties owed between persons or society in general. It has also been described as morally reprehensible acts or intrinsically wrong. 

When deciding if a specific crime rises to the level of a CMT, the Immigration Judge will review the language of the statute, the elements of the offense, and the record of conviction.

If you are charged with a crime you feel may rise to this level, speak to an experienced New Jersey immigration attorney before accepting any plea offer.  Make sure you are not solving your criminal case only to find yourself defending your right to stay in the U.S. in immigration proceedings.